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Government Offices:

Governor David Y. Ige – (808) 586-0034, Honolulu

Senator Mazie K. Hirono – (202) 224-6361, Washington, DC

Senator Brian Schatz – (202) 224-3934, Washington, DC

Attorney General Clare E. Connors – (808) 586-0034, Honolulu

Hawaii State and Federal Officials

Hawaii State Department of Health

Superintendent of Education Dr. Christina M. Kishimoto

Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) HI – CNCS is a federal agency that improves lives, strengthens communities, and fosters civic engagement through service and volunteering. Last year, the agency provided $7.7M in grants to support the more than 3,600 volunteers of all ages and backgrounds who met local needs, strengthened communities, and expanded economic opportunity through national service in Hawaii. If you’re looking for volunteers and/or applying for planning grants through AmeriCorps Hawaii, Senior Core or their related services, this is place to start your search.

Other Resources:

Association of Fundraising Professionals Aloha Chapter – AFP-AC advances philanthropy throughout Hawaii by actively promoting the practice of ethical and effective fundraising.  We are committed to education, training, advocacy, and mentoring in the field of fundraising for the benefit of all, with the spirit of aloha. Chapter members represent organizations on Oahu, Maui, Kauai and the Big Island. Visit our online membership directory to find a professional in your area of interest.

Hawaii Alliance of Nonprofit Organizations – unite and strengthen the nonprofit sector as a collective force to improve the quality of life in Hawaii through the following approach: 1) Bring together a diverse alliance of nonprofits, statewide and sector-wide, to network, learn, share ideas, collaborate, and partner; 2) Advocate for the nonprofit sector to build community awareness of its value and how to invest resources; 3) Provide communications, tools, and resources to facilitate dialogue and gathering and disseminating information for and about the sector and the community; 4) Provide professional and organizational development–workshops on nonprofit best practices and capacity-building consulting services for nonprofits and community groups; and 5) Put the collective buying power of the membership to work to save member organizations time and money.

Volunteer Legal Services Hawaii – VLHS provides free or low-cost legal help to low-income residents and the non-profit organizations serving them in communities across our state with the help of volunteers who contribute pro bono services. Volunteer attorneys host a telephone hotline every Wednesday evening at (808) 537-1868 from the hours of 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.

Community Foundations:

Hawaii Community Foundation – Based in Honolulu on Oahu, and with offices on the islands of Hawaii, Hilo, Kauai and Maui, HCF helps people make a difference by inspiring the spirit of giving and by investing in people and solutions to benefit every Island community. As the “go-to” place to learn about nonprofit agencies and resources available to them, charitable giving, and community issues, HCF tracks industry trends, commissions studies, organizes workshops and conferences, and disseminates information to the community. The Foundation distributes more than $44M in grants and contracts each year. For nonprofits also in need of volunteers, click on Catchafire to access HCF’s interactive resource.

Hawaii Peopleʻs Fund – Based in Honolulu, HPF has helped to support, build capacity, and amplify the impact of grassroots social change movements in Hawaii since 1972. No other organization specifically addresses the needs of grassroots progressive movement building. HPFʻs intersectional philosophy ensures that applicants and awardees reflect a broad range of issue areas. Fueled by community-based philanthropy, we award small grants annually to Hawaii-based organizations working towards social justice, equity, peace, and positive change in our islands. We are dedicated to the most creative, passionate, and radical visions of community, bravely navigating the intersections of indigeneity, environment, race, class, labor, gender, art, technology, mental health, incarceration, food, and other crucial issues we face.

United Ways:

Aloha United Way – Based in Honolulu, AUW is celebrating 100 years. We are committed to the health and well-being of our community. We understand our community’s greatest needs and opportunities, as well as the people and programs that can help. We currently support 320 local nonprofit organizations that deliver a wide range of services to the Hawaii community. In 2018, AUW supported these independent agencies that provided 920,000 service encounters for families and individuals in need.

Hawaii Island United Way – Based in Hilo, HIUW partners with you to invest in 54 health and human service programs that reach over 75% of Hawaii Island families and individuals each year.  All funded programs fall within the parameters of the following Community Care Impact Initiatives: 
Education – Encouraging and nurturing positive values to develop skills in children, youth and adults; Income – Empowering families and individuals to become financially stable; increasing self-sufficiency and independence; and Health – Providing for basic needs and a safety net of services that promote prevention and encourage healing and recovery.

Kauai United Way – Based in Lihue, KUW is a non-profit, volunteer-driven organization, dedicated to serving the social needs of Kauai since 1943. We monitor our agencies throughout the year and re-evaluate social needs annually. This is your assurance that your hard-earned contribution will be used efficiently and directed where it will do the most good for our entire community. How important is Kauai United Way funding? Some agencies depend heavily on our continuing support and could not exist without us. Unlike grants from other sources, which often require that their donations be tied to special projects, Kauai United Way funding is unrestricted. Agencies can use our money for whatever purpose is most important to help them serve the people on our island.

Maui United Way – Based in Wailuku, MUW has stayed vital to our community since 1945 for good reason: we know how to put the right people together with the right resources to make the right things happen. We are working to address Maui’s most vital needs through the impact areas of Education, Income (sustainability) and Health. Our goal is to bring people, organizations and our community together around a common cause, a common vision, and a common path forward.

Top Foundations:

FOUNDATION NAME TOTAL ANNUAL GIVING 
Hawaii Community Foundation$41,896,815 
Freeman Foundation$16,524,978 
Harold K. L. Castle Foundation$7,173,506 
McInerny Foundation$4,163,323 
Atherton Family Foundation$3,874,035 
Samuel N. and Mary Castle Foundation$1,984,475 
The Victoria S. and Bradley L. Geist Foundation$1,911,350 
Bank of Hawaii Foundation$1,850,168 
Hawaiian Electric Industries Charitable Foundation$1,624,062 
First Hawaiian Bank Foundation$1,567,216 
Hindu Heritage Endowment$1,216,551 
HMSA (Hawaii Medical Service Association) Foundation$1,193,813 
The James and Abigail Campbell Family Foundation$1,076,707 
George N. Wilcox General Trust$997,250 
Cooke Foundation, Limited$950,579 
The Kosasa Foundation$835,000 
LGA Family Foundation$835,000 
The Cades Foundation$570,000 
J. Watumull Fund$505,000 
First Insurance Company of Hawaii Charitable Foundation$419,641 
Teresa F. Hughes Trust$314,000 
Na Lei Aloha Foundation$288,221 
Antone and Edene Vidinha Charitable Trust$271,500 
Servco Foundation$269,550 
Fred Baldwin Memorial Foundation$266,556 
Hung Wo and Elizabeth Lau Ching Foundation$244,880 
Historic Hawaii Foundation$215,834 
George P. and Ida Tenney Castle Trust$175,000 
George F. Straub Trust Estate$111,997 
Finance Factors Foundation$84,410 
The Edward and Peggy Eu Foundation$72,720 
Hawai’i People’s Fund$48,119 
The Earl and Doris Bakken Foundation$11,950 
Hawaii National Foundation$5,800